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A Toxics-Free Future

Sustainable Development

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/a/201807/04/WS5b3bf8eba3103349141e0804_1.html

Ten years after the introduction of a strict policy to limit the use of plastics, local authorities are still looking for ways to dispose of the material safely, as Ma Chi reports.

A pair of disposable chopsticks, a plastic candy wrapper, a train ticket, orange peel, a ripped plastic bag that held the orange, a sticker tag, an apple pit, tissues...

ELAC – ECOWASTE COALITION – IPEN PRESS RELEASE

5 June 2018, Puerto Princesa City, Philippines

Incineration is not the solution.  

At a press conference coinciding with the observance of the World Environment Day, environmental advocates from Australia, Indonesia and the Philippines made a strong case against waste-to-energy (WtE) incineration touted as a solution to the garbage crisis.

Organized by the Environmental Legal Assistance Center (ELAC), EcoWaste Coalition and IPEN*, the press event shed light on the pitfalls of incinerating discards from an environmental, health and socio-economic standpoint.

“This event is being held against a backdrop of increasing concern over the plan of the Puerto Princesa City government to put up a P2.1 billion WtE gasification plan that will burn the city’s discards estimated at 100 metric tons per day,” said Atty. Gerthie Mayo-Anda, Executive Director, ELAC.  “We hope the city government will hear us out, rethink its plan and opt for holistic waste prevention and reduction strategies to cut the volume of discards requiring final disposal.”

IPEN Participating Organization, Environment and Social Development Organization (ESDO), celebrated Earth Day this year with a campaign to end plastic pollution. 

https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2018/04/youll-probably-never-save-as-many-lives-as-this-guy-who-got-the-philippines-to-stop-using-lead-paint/

While the United States effectively banned lead-based paint in 1978, in many developing countries—even after decades of research showing how lead is linked to learning disabilities, lower IQ, and other health effects in children—the element is still abundantly applied in paint products, with lead concentrations sometimes up to 100 times higher than what’s permitted in the US.

The Philippines had long been a prime example of this. Just ten years ago, local activist Manny Calonzo decided to test the paint in his home countrythe first person to publicly do so. Calonzo had long been involved in consumer safety, working for Consumers International in Penang, Malaysia, in the late 90s. After he returned to his home country, in 2008, he became president of pollution watchdog EcoWaste Coalition, a network of more than 150 environmental groups based in Quezon City.

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